Theta Brainwaves - extrem relaxing meditation

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Theta Brainwaves

Theta Brainwave Meditation - 6 Hz
LISTEN WITH STEREO HEADPHONES!

Theta-frequencies are measurable during deep relaxation and light sleep with active subconsciousness. Its measuring rate covers 3 to 8 Hz. A human being getting asleep produces waves at the lower point of the measuring scale, the upper limit of the scale is reached at deep relaxation periods. Theta-frequencies are considered as most qualified to mentally train human brainwaves.

The Theory Behind Theta Brainwaves

Theta brainwaves, or the theta rhythm, are measurable during deep relaxation, meditation, dreaming, REM sleep and light sleep. They are the daydreamer's brainwave, where we are still awake but disengaged from the outside world for inward reflection. Theta waves occur from 3 to 8 Hz, with the lower end of the spectrum more common during sleep and the higher end present during relaxation. In fact, the Earth itself resonates at 7.83 Hz, a theta frequency called the Schumann Resonance.

Theta Brainwaves In Practice

Theta brainwaves walk the like between the conscious and the subconscious. In our sleep cycle, the most theta brainwaves occur in the period right between sleeping and awake and in bursts during the R.E.M. or dreaming phase. While we are awake, we produce the most theta waves during deep relaxation and meditation. Studies have shown that while resting quietly produces more alpha waves, deep inward meditation triggers an increase in theta waves.

More experienced meditation practitioners produce more theta waves, indicting their profound resonance with their subconscious. Recent studies have also shown that increased theta rhythm activity improves our memory recall. If you have ever been in the middle of a mundane activity and abruptly remembered something, theta waves likely played a role. Increased theta wave activity may also improve our ability to learn. When going through a repetitive activity, such as driving the some route home from work or brushing our teeth, our brains will dip into theta wave activity. We relax, and a pipeline to our subconscious opens up. This is why you will remember where you put your day planner while scrubbing the bathtub or slip into daydreaming and barely remember a drive home.

Connecting us with the Schumann Resonances, the frequency of the earth and ocean, can also have a profound effect on our physical and emotional state. In 1963, Professor Rutger Wever of the Max Planck Institute for Behavioral Physiology built an underground bunker capable of blocking the Schumann Resonances. A group of volunteers lived in the bunker for up to four weeks. Wever quickly noticed that screening out the Schumann Resonances increased stress levels, emotional upset and even instances of migraine headaches in his volunteers.

However, even a brief exposure to the Schumann Resonances quickly alleviated these problems. Modern cities and homes, abuzz with electrical interference, can block the Schumann Resonances much like Wever's bunker. If Wever's research is any indication, being without these Resonances will have a rapid and profound negative impact your physical, emotional and psychological health.

Benefits of Synchronizing Theta Brainwaves

What better way to teach your brain than to tap into the brainwaves that help us learn? Theta rhythms are the best waves to target for brainwave entrainment. Theta brainwaves can be targeted to improve meditation, induce deep but focused relaxation, improve creativity and your ability to learn. Theta-attuned music is some of the fastest to produce results. For those with chronic anxiety or looking for a way to unwind after stressful days, theta wave entrainment may help. Used in part of a series, synchronizing to theta waves can help induce sleep and lucid dreaming, and tapping into Schumann Resonances can restore our natural balance with the Earth's frequencies, promoting total mind-body well being.

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Hi, I'm Robert and I'm passionate about healthy lifestyle, yoga and meditation.
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